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    Famous Paris Places and Neighborhoods

    The Eiffel Tower When the Eiffel Tower was completed in 1889, it was the tallest building in the world at just over 300 meters high. The tower was originally built as a temporary structure to commemorate the centennial of the French Revolution for the 1889 World’s Fair exposition.  What was once a temporary exhibit became permanent and now the monument is the enduring symbol of the city of Paris and France itself. Back in the 1880’s, the tower’s steel construction defied all traditional rules of architecture.  Gustave Eiffel’s design was considered quite bold at the time. Today the tower is the main television transmitter for the city of Paris and the most visited site in France.…

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    Hauts-de-France

    Welcome to France’s Northernmost Region Hauts-de-France is France’s northern most state. It was formed by combining the regions of Nord-Pas-De-Calais and Picardy. oVer 6 million people live in the Hauts-de-France region. About Nord-Pas-De-Calais Located on France’s northern border with Belgium is the Nord-Pas-De-Calais region. Nord-De-Pas-Calais was featured prominently in both WWI and WWII. The vast network of memorials and museums attest to this fact. The region is just a few hours via train from Paris. When visiting be sure to enjoy the fine selection of locally brewed beers. Yes, France makes great beer too, although this fact is usually lost when compared with France’s neighbors to the north and east.…

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    Occitanie

    Midi-Pyrénées Region and the City of Toulouse Welcome to the Midi-Pyrénées Region The Midi-Pyrénées region is located in the heart of south-western France. The region extends from the wooded hills of the Dordogne in the north, to the great river valleys in the center, and the majestic Pyrenees mountains and the Spanish border to the south. One of France’s largest regions with a landscape dotted with ancient towns, charming villages, castles, Romanesque churches and a rich history. The region is known for its agriculture. The region produces a variety of crops including corn, soy, sunflowers, tobacco, wheat, tomatoes, a variety of beans, kiwis, melons, strawberries, apples, pears, plums and peaches.…

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    Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes

    Visit the rustic and quiet Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region of France Auvergne Anchoring the center of France is the Massif Central, a rugged plateau of ancient granite and hardened lava. The landscape is punctuated by volcanic peaks and deep river gorges. This is the land of the Auvergne, a region of natural beauty and dramatic landscapes, located midway between Paris and the Mediterranean sea. The Auvergne is believed to have been inhabited since prehistoric times. In fact, regional artifacts suggest that the Celts lived here as early as 400 BC. Today, the Auvergne boasts some of France’s most beautiful Romanesque churches and Renaissance era palaces. The first cathedral built in the region…

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    Normandy Tours from Paris FAQ’s

    Answers to some of the most common Normandy touring questions Can you tour Normandy on your own? If you are driving a car, you can certainly visit the local museums and drive the coastline.  If arrive via train at Caen or Bayeux station, you’ll want to join a tour or rent a car since you are at least 20 miles from any actual D-Day landing site. How many days are needed to visit Normandy? Normandy is a region that stretches 300 miles from Belgium to Brittany, but you can fit the American D-Day highlights into one busy and enjoyable day.  It’s ideal to add a second day to see Mont…

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    France and Cheese, A Match Made in Heaven

    by Laura Glendinning England has cheddar, Italy has Parmesan, Holland has Gouda, Greece has Feta and France has Roquefort, Camembert, Brie, Comte, Gruyere, and, well you get the idea.  As Charles de Gaulle once asked “how can you govern a country in which there are 246 kinds of cheese?”  Make that at least 1200 and some say 2000.  You won’t ever taste it all, but you can try! Cheesemaking goes back to the Egyptians, according to some archeologists, and spread throughout the ancient world via trade routes. In Europe, after the fall of the Romans and the descent of the Dark Ages, cheese was considered peasant food at best and…