• All About Paris

    How to Visit the Champagne Region of France

    We offer four ways of visiting the Champagne region for a day from Paris: Full day trip from Paris to Epernay Full day trip from Paris to Reims Self-guided trip to Moet and Chandon (Epernay) Self-guided trip to G.H. Mumm (Reims) GUIDED SMALL GROUP FULL DAY TRIPS With LinkParis.com, you can make a full day of touring focusing on either Epernay or Reims, with a city tour, cellar visit, vineyard visit, gourmet lunch (included) and full guide services throughout the day. Bring the local region to life with a full day tour from Paris.  You’ll be with a group of no more than 8 people. Read our reviews on Trip Advisor. Self-Guided Half-Day…

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    Tuileries and Opera

    The 19th-century grandeur of Baron Haussmann’s Grands Boulevards offsets the bustle of bankers, theater-goers, sightseers and shoppers who frequent the area around the Opera. Throughout the neighborhood, a profusion of shops and department stores draw the crowds. Much of the area’s older character is found in the early 19th-century shopping arcades, with elaborate steel and glass roofs which are known as “galleries” or “passages” and were restored to their former glory in the 1970s. Gallery Vivienne, which is the choicest, has an elaborate, patterned mosaic floor. the Passage des Panoramas, Passage Verdeau and the tiny Passage des Princes are more old school Parisian. The streets abound with food shops of…

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    A Day in the Fascinating Loire Valley In a Day

    A chronicle of a one day visit from Paris to the Loire Valley When I was a kid I considered Europe to be a place where knights and damsels and castles were still the way people lived, with some peasants picturesquely gathering wheat in the background of a jousting tournament.  There was definitely a guy with a lute hovering nearby. How that exactly makes sense given you have to take a plane to get there, well, that is kid logic.  The Europeans don’t take planes.  We do! It’s a big Medieval Times restaurant, right? You could just about think that on a trip to the Loire Valley, which has 300…

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    The Amazing History of Paris, France

    A short history of Paris from 508 AD onward Paris was founded towards the end of the 3rd century BC on what is now the Ile de la Cite by a tribe of Celtic Gauls known as the Parisii. Centuries of conflict between the Gauls and Romans ended in 52 BC, when Julius Caesar’s legions took control of the territory. Christianity was introduced in the 2nd century AD, and Roman rule finally ended in the 5th century with the arrival of the Franks. In 508 AD, Frankish king Clovis I united Gaul as a kingdom and made Paris the capital, naming it after the original Parisii tribe. Paris prospered during…

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    Beautiful Sacré-Cœur

    A Bit of Sacré-Cœur History After the Franco-Prussian War ended in 1870, the people of France decided to construct a church in honor of the Sacred Heart in Paris on the butte Montmartre. Originally the funds for the construction of Sacré-Cœur were to come only from wealthy donors. However in 1873, the government of France decreed its construction to be a state undertaking. Seventy-eight different architects entered a competition for the right to design the church. The winning design was submitted by a veteran architect named Paul Abadie. Abadie was already well known for his restoration of the St. Front Cathedral in Perigueux. When Was the Sacré-Cœur Church Built The plans…

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    Storming the Beaches of Normandy with Link Paris

    Hail had hit Paris the night before my trip to Normandy, and the morning dawned cold.  It was April, so I don’t even want to think about what February was like that year.   I was wearing a long coat, turtleneck, a scarf, no gloves (this will matter later), and warm shoes and socks.  It’s what a California dweller like myself will wear when it hits 63 degrees.  I was off to Normandy for a D-Day tour, well aware that in 1944, the weather was equally dismal and it was June. Should I have packed snowshoes? These days we email clients their Normandy train tickets.  They get the bar code scanned…

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    Saint Germain Des Pres

    Get to know the charming Saint Germain Des Pres area of Paris After World War II, Saint Germain des Pres became synonymous with the intellectual life of Paris centered on the open bars and charming cafes. Philosophers, writers, actors and musicians mingled in the cellar nightspots and brasseries, where existentialist philosophy coexisted with American jazz. The area is now wealthier than in the heyday of Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir, or enigmatic singer Juliette Grécot and the new-wave film makers (such as Godard and Truffaut).  However, the writers and wannabe poets are still around, enjoying the pleasures of sitting in Les Deux magots, Café de Flore and other haunts,…

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    The Palace of Versailles History

    All about Versailles – France’s most important chateau Versailles was the royal residence of France for more than a century (from 1682 until 1789), when the French Revolution began.  Way back when, Louis XIII built a hunting lodge at the village of Versailles outside of Paris in 1624. The small structure became the base on which was constructed one of the most costly and extravagant buildings in the world. It became the palace of Louis XIV, the “Sun King”, who said of himself, “L’Etat c’est moi” or “I am the state.” Louis XV and Louis XVI also called Versailles home. (picture: formal garden at Versailles) Creating this ultimate palace were Louis…

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    Museum d’Orsay

    The History of the Museum d’Orsay in Paris After the Louvre, the Museum d’Orsay is the most famous museum in Paris. It’s hard to believe that this light-filled building with a collection of amazing art was once a train station, but it was.    The original rail station was built by Victor Laloux and inaugurated in 1900 for that year’s Universal Exhibition. The first ever electric trains in France terminated at d’Orsay. The station was closed in 1939, a victim of progress as newer and bigger stations were built in Paris. The structure was registered as a listed and protected building in 1978. The Museum d’Orsay opened on the site…

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    Food and France

    A journey to discover the best food in France Most of Europe lives on bread, cheese and some form of ham and sausage. They are the staples of the continent. So why then is it all so fantastic in France?  Why is France above the rest?  Pipe down, Italians, you know it’s true (even though I’ve never had a bad meal in Italy!).  I love focaccia, but who thought of the croissant? No one but the French.  Spain’s mancheca cheese is awesome.  Plus tapas.  But the sheer variety and fancifulness of French food is beyond compare. As for pastries. Sorry Britain, ten types of custard and mince pie is not even on the…