• All About Paris

    Let’s Travel: France Train Information

    LinkParis.com is an authorized Rail Europe agency, let us book all of your European rail for you, call us toll free in the US at 1-424-386-5222 or email.  MAJOR PARIS, FRANCE TRAIN STATIONS Paris has six major train stations. If you are traveling outside of Paris or to another country by rail you will indeed pass through one of these six stations. Gare d’Austerlitz, Gare de l’Est, Gare de Lyon, Gare Montparnasse, Gare du Nord, Gare Saint Lazare. Here is a list along with popular destinations each station serves: Gare Saint Lazare : (Major destinations) – Normandy. Gare Montparnasse: Brittany, Atlantic coast, and southwest France. Gare du Nord: Northern France, Belgium, Luxembourg, Netherlands and the…

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    Custom World War One Tour

    Take a Custom World War One Tour from Paris with Us Though the living memory of World War I has faded, touring the famous sites of the ‘War to End All Wars” is easily done in a day trip from Paris, mostly just little more than a two hour drive. Below are three sample tour itineraries, but we can organize your day any way you like. World War One Tour Option 1 – America in World War I – The Battle of Belleau Wood After the Russians surrendered to the Germans on the Eastern Front, the Axis powers were free to focus exclusively on capturing Paris. France was surely doomed.…

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    Current France Travel Information

    Traveling to France – Current Info France will be opening again sooner rather than later (especially with the approval of multiple vaccines in the EU) – that is the important takeaway. However, as of February 1st 2021, visitors from the United States have not been cleared for travel to France. No further information on any precautions or exact dates yet. Check out our Top Five Day Trips from Paris.

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    The Bibliotheque Nationale de France

    The National Library of France The mission of the French national library, the Bibliotheque Nationale de France, is to collect and conserve all works published in France, regardless of media, with the explicit purpose of making them available to researchers and journalists. Under French law, all publishers must deposit several copies of each work they publish in the library upon publication. In 1368, Charles V, “the Wise”, had his own personal library moved into the Louvre. The collection contained nine hundred and seventeen manuscripts. In those days, however, royal collections were transient in nature as they were irretrievably dispersed on their owner’s death. It was not until Louis XI, who…

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    19 Great Paris Hotels

    Our list of the best Paris hotels Great location, great service, memorable food – all these Paris hotels have that, and more. The list is in no particular order; it made sense to us to let all nineteen hotels be viewed as equals. Hotel des Academies des Arts had the benefit of being the first hotel we chose for our list, so it occupies top slot for no other reason than that. You will rarely find a gym or a pool at Paris hotels that aren’t 5-star, but you will invariably find a cute breakfast room and a space for evening drinks at virtually all of them. Paris hotels are…

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    A Traveler’s Guide to French Rail

    Get to know the French rail system If you have never been to France before, understanding the French rail system seems a bit overwhelming.   At home, we are used to taking our car on long journeys, or using a nimble carrier like Southwest Airlines or Alaska to get to a regional city.   Although Easy Jet and others have made inroads, Europe is fully committed to rail, and then some.  Getting between most European cities by rail is easy, and often faster than air travel, because you don’t have to go way out of town to the airport, wait for security and otherwise be hassled, as with air travel. For example, Eurostar…

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    A few nice moments in Paris…

    Visions of Paris Some interesting and (hopefully) thought provoking photos of the city of light. There are hundreds of cafes in the city.  Sitting and watching the pulse of daily Parisian life from one of these chairs is one of the great pleasures of visiting France. The food is often great at these cafes. Avoid the larger chain brands like Hippopotamus if you can (even though they serve pretty good food too). Paris street signs are usually embedded on the corner of each building at an intersection.  Just look up! No street signs on the corner here. If you want to dig deeper, we found an article in France Today…

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    Les Invalides History and Visitor Information

    What is Les Invalides? In 1670 King Louis XIV (the “Sun King”) founded a hospital for his old and injured “invalid” soldiers. Les Invalides was designed by architect Liberal Bruant. The hospital was completed in 1676. It was designed to house up to 4,000 soldiers. Today, Les Invalides is a museum and national monument, however, the French military still uses part of the complex as a base. Beneath Invalides impressive gold dome are two churches. One for the common soldiers and the other for the King to be entombed upon his death. The King’s church is now the site of Napoleon’s tomb. Les Invalides Visitor Hours and Location Location: Esplanade…

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    The Latin Quarter

    On the Rive Gauche (Left Bank) you’ll find the lively student area known as the Latin Quarter, so-named a few centuries ago because the students at the Sorbonne were speaking and learning Latin. Winding streets and few wide avenues make for a great walking area. Wandering will reveal cute shops and the remains of a Roman Amphitheater (Paris was once called Lutetia Parisiorum by the Romans. It’s a reference to the swamps beside the Seine. The look has improved over the centuries. Besides students, the Latin Quarter is all about music. You go down into a cellar for the most part. Maybe that’s where we get the term dive bar?…

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    La Defense Neighborhood of Paris

    During the early 1960’s, the French government made the decision that instead of further crowding the city center of Paris they would create a business district outside the city. With tall buildings, colossal modern art, and concrete plazas, La Defense was regarded for a long time as a laboratory of contemporary architecture, with mixed results. The district which extends along the communes from Puteaux, Courbevoie and Nanterre, is Paris’s business center and draws about 200,000 each work day. La Defense is decorated by The Grande Arche. Finished in 1989 (one hundred years after the Eiffel Tower’s completion), the Arch is a modern salute to the Arc de Triomphe. While the area offers…