• All About Paris

    Paris in February

    Starring Dante the Dog, JuJu, and a Real Live Mummy One of the consequences of living in Los Angeles is that you develop a true fear of temperatures below 60 degrees. Try tearing your drawers apart finding matching socks when you spend your life in flip flops. Never mind remembering gloves, scarves and turtlenecks. It’s worth it though because visiting Paris in the winter is a look at the real Paris. There are far fewer tourists. It’s a northern European city, after all, a city with an underground transport system, out of the weather, well-heated museums, and hundreds of warm cafes awaiting discovery. No, you are not going to see…

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    Our Awesome Top 10 Paris Tips

    Ten Paris tips to get your Paris vacation started. Fodor’s recently released their “10 Things You Need to Know Before You Go to Paris” list. It is a good article. Here is our own top ten Paris tips list. 1. Dining in Paris – Paris Tips Hot Pick: You do not need to tip in a Paris restaurant. Enjoy the freedom of not tipping! It is wonderful once you get used to it. I’ve been to Paris over 30 times. It took me at least fifteen trips before I didn’t leave a tip after a meal. There is no reason to wait! When I finally did it, the waiter didn’t…

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    The Bastille and The National Opera of Paris

    The Bastille holds a special place of importance in French history. By crossing the Seine and following the Boulevard de la Bastille, you will find the site of the Bastille Saint-Antoine, which was a major part of the defenses ordered by Charles V in the dark ages. Original construction began back as far as the year 1370! Louis XIV had the ramparts demolished but kept the structure as a “luxury” prison for people of “quality”. Seen by the commoners as a symbol of the arbitrariness of the old monarchy, the prison was stormed by local Parisians on 14th July 1789, and later razed. A column surmounted by the “Spirit of…

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    Three Offbeat Interesting Things to do in Paris

    Three offbeat things to do in Paris. There is much more to the city of light than the Eiffel Tower and Louvre. 1. CITE DES SCIENCES ET DE L’INDUSTRIE One of the world’s most respected science museums is La Cite des Sciences et de l’Industrie in Paris. The museum is located in the Parc de la Villette.  It is considered a masterpiece of modern architecture. Among the museum’s top attractions are: Experience the Explora where you can step inside of a camera or travel through the human body, and much more. Board the Argonaute, a former attack submarine. The Geode, one of the world’s largest geodesic domes (pictured above), and France’s first Omnimax movie theatre…

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    The Historic Notre Dame de Paris Cathedral

    Known as a gothic masterpiece, the cathedral of Notre Dame was conceived by Maurice de Sully in the 12th century. The cathedral took over 200 years to build. Construction was finally completed in 1345.  In April of 2019, the cathedral was damaged in an inferno that ruined much of the structure.  Rebuilding efforts are underway. A short video about the cathedral: Notre Dame is the spiritual and geographical center of France. All road distances in France are calculated on the basis of the “0 km” marked on the square in front of the cathedral. It is also one of the most visited sites in France. For those so inclined, it…

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    Museum of Aeronautics at Bourget

    Visit the Museum of Aeronautics at Bourget in Paris Since 1975 France’s Air and Space Museum has delighted the world with a host of attractions. The museum was originally situated in Meudon, founded right after WWI. It moved to the Bourget in 1975. Why Bourget? Well it just happens to be the place where Charles Lindburgh landed after his 33 hour flight from Long Island. The Main Gallery, where the oldest aircraft are displayed, offers a collection of over 180 machines giving a complete panorama of the aerospace era, from the original “heavier than air” glider Massiat-Biot (1879) to the Ariane rocket. Connected to the Main Hall is a remodeled…

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    The Picasso Museum in Paris

    History of the Picasso Museum Pablo Picasso was a native of Spain, but he spent most of his adult life in Paris and along the Cote d’Azur. After his death in 1973, at the age of 92, the French government was given thousands of Picasso’s works in lieu of estate taxes. You can see a rotating collection of the 10,000 sketches, notebooks, fine art and ceramics Picasso produced at the 17th century mansion in the trendy Marais district that houses his work. A multi-year expansion and renovation was completed in 2014, allowing many more works to be seen. Works of Picasso’s contemporaries such as Cezanne and Matisse have been added…

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    Montparnasse Neighborhood of Paris

    In the 18th century, students began reciting open air poems like the Greeks they admired. They named the hill where they gathered Mount Parnassus…. and voila, Montparnasse was born. This area has one of the grander boulevards of Paris, Boulevard Montparnasse, and also has the dubious honor of having Paris’s lone, reviled high rise, the Tour Montparnasse. The view of Paris from the observation deck is undeniably phenomenal, however. Montparnasse was the favored neighborhood of artistic luminaries from Picasso to Hemingway, Chagall to Cocteau, until construction of the giant rail station meant blocks and blocks of cheap lodging was wiped away. Still, old school cafe life can be found at…

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    Montmartre and Pigalle

    Perched on a steep hill north of the city center is Montmartre and the beautiful Sacre-Coeur church. Montmartre remains a contained and slightly sullied throwback to a bygone era, with winding streets, ivy-clad houses with exquisite gardens, and artists’ studios that one could picture Picasso slaving away in. Sacre Coeur is endlessly besieged by bus tours, as is the Place du Tertre, the main artist hub adjacent to the church. As soon as you get off the main thoroughfares though, the area is surprisingly village like. The tiny 12th-century church of St-Pierre de Montmartre is one of the oldest in the city, while the quiet streets, cafes and squares have a…

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    Marais, Beaubourg, Les Halles, Bastille

    Beaubourg and Les Halles are Paris’s most thriving public areas, with millions of tourists, shoppers and students flowing between them each year. Young people flock to Les Halles, shopping for the latest street fashions beneath the concrete and glass bubbles of the underground arcades. All roads from Les Halles appear to lead to the Pompidou Centre, an avant-garde assembly of pipes, ducts and cables which houses the Musée National d’Art Moderne (Museum of Modern Art). The smaller streets around the center are full of art galleries which make there home in crooked gabled buildings. The neighboring Marais, with some of the oldest surviving streets and buildings in Paris, was abandoned…